The University of Chicago
The University of Chicago

Division of the Physical Sciences

Admissions & Aid

Dear Prospective Student,

On behalf of the faculty, students, and staff of the University of Chicago Graduate Division of the Physical Sciences, I am pleased to welcome you to the division’s website. Whether you are seeking information regarding a particular graduate program or just surfing the web for general information about graduate study in the physical sciences, we’re glad you’re here. If you’re a prospective applicant to the College of the University of Chicago, you’re welcome to look around too, but you will also want to go to the College of the University of Chicago for information about undergraduate programs and admissions.

Scientific research has been fundamental to the University of Chicago since the day it opened its doors. The first American Nobel laureate, Albert Michelson, founded the Department of Physics at the turn of the 20th Century and in the years since 45 other Nobel Laureates have been associated with the division, more than any other single institution in the world. Their wide-ranging interests and work illustrate both the spirit of discovery and commitment to interdisciplinary research which continue to inspire and animate the physical sciences faculty, students, and staff today.

So, if you’re planning to pursue doctoral study or looking for a baccalaureate program in the physical sciences, you’ve come to the right place. While you’re here we hope you’ll wander around in the pages devoted to the division’s departments, research institutes, multi-disciplinary centers, and professional journals and organizations. The Division offers eight PhD programs and four one-year Master of Science programs and currently provides study, training, and research opportunities for nearly 500 doctoral students and about 250 students in professional masters programs.

The division is very proud of its students, as well it should be; more than one-third of the Nobel laureates associated with the division studied and were trained in our classrooms and laboratories before going on to distinguished scientific careers at other institutions. We have tried in these pages to present them as they are: dressed in their work clothes with sleeves rolled up and going about their day-to-day business which at Chicago is pursuing some of the most advanced and exciting scientific research in the world today.

So I hope you will also take time as well to look around in the pages devoted to our current students and to the many resources available at the university to support them in their work and their everyday lives. And for good measure we include links to a wealth of information about the university past and present, the local Hyde Park neighborhood, and of course the Great City of Chicago.

Thanks for your interest in the Division of the Physical Sciences. I hope you find in these pages a stimulating and inviting glimpse of the rich and exciting intellectual life that the division and its components support. If you are interested in applying to one of our graduate programs, follow the link to the appropriate program, read through its entry, and follow the links to the online application site and instructions.

If you have further questions that these web pages do not answer, don’t hesitate to contact us. We’ll be happy to talk with you.

Sincerely,

Miranda Swanson
Dean of Students
Division of the Physical Sciences

ATLAS Detector

Used in High Energy Physics experiments to study proton-proton collisions.

Click to enlarge

Nuclear Energy

Nuclear Energy

Henry Moore’s statue Nuclear Energy, with the Regenstein Library and Max Palevsky residence hall in background.

(Creative Commons image)

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Starry Sky

The night sky seems to hold an infinite amount of stars. Astronomy and Astrophysics

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