Latest News and Announcements

Simulations describe HIV’s ‘diabolical delivery device’

From a virus’s point of view, invading our cells is a matter of survival. The virus makes a living by hijacking cellular processes to produce more of the proteins that make it up.

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UChicago physicists first to see behavior of quantum materials in curved space

Light and matter are typically viewed as distinct entities that follow their own, unique rules. Matter has mass and typically exhibits interactions with other matter, while light is massless and does not interact with itself. Yet, wave-particle duality tells us that matter and light both act sometimes like particles, and sometimes like waves.

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Yamuna Krishnan and Yossi Weizmann in the Chemistry Department receive individual awards.

Yamuna Krishnan and Yossi Weizmann both won awards for their work in Chemistry in Chicago.

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Two PSD faculty members, Mike Franklin & Angela Olinto, have received named professorships effective July 1, 2016.

Mike Franklin, Professor in the Department of Computer Science and the College, has been named the first Liew Family Chairman.           

Angela Olinto, currently the Homer J. Livingston Professor, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics and the College, will become the Homer J. Livingston Distinguished Service Professor.

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Jared Lewis receives 2016 Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award

Jared Lewis has been selected for a 2016 Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award from the Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation. Lewis, an assistant professor in chemistry at the University of Chicago, is one of 13 Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award recipients this year. He will receive an unrestricted grant of $75,000 to support his research on “Engineering Proteins for Selective Catalysis.”

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Wendy Freedman Named 2016 Woman in Space Science

On Thursday, May 12, Chicago’s Adler Planetarium presented the 2016 Women in Space Science Award to Wendy L. Freedman, the John & Marion Sullivan Professor of Astronomy & Astrophysics.

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Lonely planets

The event: an Oxford-style debate. The occasion: a celebration of the Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics’s 123rd year, in conjunction with the University of Chicago’s 125th anniversary last fall. The place: the William Eckhardt Research Center, the department’s new home.

The proposition: by the end of 2042—significant for being 150 years after the department’s founding—remote sensing will reveal evidence of extant life on an exoplanet. The fine print: we don’t have to physically visit the site; evidence does not mean certain proof; organisms must be currently living; and life forms need not be intelligent. The winner: to be determined by audience vote.

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Quartet of exoplanets locked in complex dance

Orbital structure points to planetary migration in solar systems, study finds.

The four planets of the Kepler-223 star system seem to have little in common with the planets of Earth’s own solar system. And yet a new study shows that the Kepler-223 system is trapped in an orbital configuration that Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune may have broken out of in the early history of the solar system. 

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National Academy of Sciences elects two UChicago faculty members

Two UChicago faculty members—mathematician Vladimir Drinfeld and physicist Wayne Hu­—have been elected to the National Academy of Sciences. They are among the 84 new members and 21 foreign associates from 14 countries that the academy is recognizing for their distinguished and continuing achievements in original research. 

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BA/MSCAPP Degree Announcement

We are pleased to announce the creation of a BA/MSCAPP joint degree, which will be open for Fall 2016 enrollment for students in the College of the University of Chicago.

In Fall 2014, the Harris School of Public Policy, in partnership with the Department of Computer Science, became the first public policy school to launch a Master of Science in Computational Analysis and Public Policy program (MSCAPP), the only STEM program in public policy in the world. 

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Foote awarded Kelly Prize

Professor Michael Foote has been awarded the 2016 recipient Arthur L. Kelly Faculty Prize for Exceptional Service in the Physical Sciences Division. 

The prize was established in the Division three years ago by Arthur L. Kelly, who received his MBA from the University in 1964 and established the same faculty prize at Chicago Booth in 1999.  In addition to his contributions to finance, business, international relations, and geography,

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Prof. Michael Turner’s May 5 lecture at Adler Planetarium to be simulcast nationally

Prof. Michael Turner will explore some of the biggest mysteries of modern cosmology in a 7:30 p.m. May 5 lecture at the Adler Planetarium. The cosmologist’s Kavli Fulldome Lecture, titled “From the Big Bang to the Multiverse and Beyond,” will be streamed live at 15 other institutions across North America.

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$20.5 million in gifts support expansion of initiatives in computer science

Two gifts totaling $20.5 million will help initiate an ambitious effort to expand research and education in UChicago’s Department of Computer Science and its connections to other areas of the University’s work, with support for faculty, graduate students and undergraduates.

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Joshua Frieman elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences

Professor part-time in astronomy Joshua Frieman has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He joins a prestigious group of scholars, artists, writers and scientists attempting to solve world issues through collaboration and innovation. Please join us in congratulating him on this achievement.

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Experiment probes nature of space and time-- scientists listen for 'holographic noise' at the universe's smallest scale

For the past year at Fermilab, an instrument called the Holometer has been probing the fundamental nature of space. The experiment uses an array of lasers and mirrors to try and answer the question, “If you look at the infinitesimally small scale, is space smooth and unbroken—the way we experience it in everyday life—or is it pixelated like the image on a TV screen?”

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